THE BASIC LAW OF CHILDREN'S CREATIVITY IS THAT ITS VALUE LIES NOT IN ITS RESULTS, NOT IN THE PRODUCT OF CREATION, BUT IN THE PROCESS ITSELF.    

- VYGOTSKY, RUSSIAN PSYCHOLOGIST & EDUCATOR 

What is  process art and how does it foster creativity?

We'd like to dispel a few of the myths.

While process art is developmentally

appropriate for children ages 2-5, children and adults of all ages can benefit from process-based art experiences. 

Process art is only for preschoolers.
Process art has to be messy.

All art can be messy at times, but that is not a specific characteristic of process art. If messy isn't your thing, we are happy to suggest supplies that are virtually mess-free and help you with management techniques so that you're more focused on the creative process and less worried about the mess.

Process art is chaotic;
there is no structure.

While process art might look chaotic to an observer, there is actually a lot of thought and planning that goes on behind  the scenes. Every experience is created with the artists' interests, needs, and developmental ability in mind.

Materials are readily available and accessible to artists 
all of the time.

More isn't better! Materials and supplies are carefully selected, depending on the experience we are curating, and offered in small amounts at different times. Putting out a new material halfway through an experience creates excitement and challenges artists to incorporate it into their work.

Process art isn't always about having something "pretty" to put  on the refrigerator. Sometimes an artist will have a finished piece to take home, and sometimes he/she won't! But it is always up to the artist to make that decision.

Process art doesn't yield
a finished product.

Process art is a meaningful, 

organic way for artists to explore new

materials and make decisions. However, as facilitators of the exploration process, it's our job to engage with artists, ask questions, and guide them through the creative process, not just sit back and watch.

Process art is only about
free exploration; artists do whatever they want.

Process art does not have to be a "one and done" piece of work, although for some artists it might be. Like any creation, it can   always be revisited, revised, added to, and reworked. Listen to your artists and let their interests and engagement be your guide!

Process art is completed in one session; children don't revisit their work.

Benefits of process art include

  • Critical thinking skills

  • Problem solving and decision making skills

  • Gross and fine motor development 

  • Creativity and self-expression

  • Risk taking and confidence building 

  • Patience and perseverance

  • Emotional wellness 

  • Natural integration of math, science, social studies and literacy

There are many benefits
to process art!